Category Archives: eschatology (last things)

Uneasy about death? You should be and its ok

Recently, a friend from church was sharing about her episode with anaphylaxis shock. She was home alone with her infant when suddenly and without warning, her body started reacting to what, is unknown. She couldn’t make it to the phone … Continue reading

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The things hoped for: on faith and the resurrection

As we Christians celebrate the bodily resurrection of our Lord, we loudly proclaim that he is risen. Now through much of my Christian life, I tended to translate that into merely a spiritual enterprise. Meaning, the resurrection signifies the forgiveness … Continue reading

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The unintended prosperity gospel: why tangibility matters

If you’ve followed me for any period of time, you know that I abhor the prosperity gospel. As I wrote about here, the prosperity gospel has a deceptive nature in that it is not really about getting rich. Because of … Continue reading

Posted in eschatology (last things), humanity, pain and suffering, reflections and musings | 1 Comment

Why church matters matter . . . Revelation and deception

I’ve been working on a post on Rev. 13:16-18 and in doing some commentary diving, was struck by Greg Beale’s commentary on Rev. 13:11.  The passage of Rev. 13:11-14 sets the backdrop of my next post and Beale’s poignant assessment … Continue reading

Posted in culture, eschatology (last things), faith, reflections and musings | 1 Comment

Does 1 Thess 5:1-11 indicate a seven year tribulation?

I’m continually mindful that we often read presuppositions into the biblical text especially when convinced of a particular position. I think it’s just natural to do that. My shifting views on eschatology that is causing me to re-examine portions of … Continue reading

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